mexicon:
The Journal of
Mesoamerican Studies


For over 30 years the most up-to-date information on trends and developments in the fields of cultural anthropology, archae­ology, and linguistics.
News as it breaks: events affecting indigenous communities, new archaeo­logical discoveries, important dates and details on conferences, exhibitions, and fellowships.
Research notes and articles: bringing you the latest on a wide range of topics and issues bearing on Mesoamerica.
The most thorough bibliography on Meso­america available any­where: the newest books and articles from around the globe.



mexicon is a peer reviewed journal and is published bi-monthly, volumes starting in February each year.

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in memory of
Pierre Robert Colas


Volume XXXVIII, No. 4, August 2016

mexicon 38/4
Contents

Grace Bascopé and Thomas Guderjan
Contemporary Use and Recycling of ancient Maya artifacts in a contemporary Maya village: A Case study from Yaxunah


Fátima Tec Pool and Guido Krempel
The Paintings of Aktun Santuario, Akil, Yucatan







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Grace Bascopé and Thomas Guderjan
Contemporary Use and Recycling of ancient Maya artifacts in a contemporary Maya village: A Case study from Yaxunah

This article documents the re-use of ancient Maya artifacts for new purposes by Don Manuel Tamay, a shaman of the Yucatec Maya village of Yaxuna. Additionally, we discuss the importance of such re-use of ancient materials for our interpretation of the archaeological record.

Fátima Tec Pool and Guido Krempel
The Paintings of Aktun Santuario, Akil, Yucatan

Since formative times until nowadays the diverse Mesoamerican cultures used caves as habitations, places of refuge, workplaces, rural water supplies and destinies for ritual pilgrimages, to name just a few benefits. In 2010 was identified a cave designated Aktun Santuario ("Sanctuary Cave") located in the municipality of Akil, Yucatan, which was "sealed" by the ancient Maya. The exploration of the cave determined its significance regarding the quantity of contextual information which turns out to be valuable for the fields of archaeology (ceramic and lithic remains, modifications of the natural environment, constructions of ritual altars) as well as iconography. Aktun Santuario contains a vast amount of elaborately rendered painted motifs of various themes (hand prints, abstract motifs, anthropomorphic and zoomorphic). The objective of the present study is the presentation and analysis of the paintings, their distribution within the cave, and the correlation of these pictographs with associated ceramic remains which helps to understand the different ritual uses of the cave.