mexicon:
The Journal of
Mesoamerican Studies


For over 30 years the most up-to-date information on trends and developments in the fields of cultural anthropology, archae­ology, and linguistics.
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in memory of
Pierre Robert Colas


Volume XXXVIII, No. 6, December 2016

mexicon 38/6
Contents

Hadley DesMeules and Antonia E. Foias
Connections between the Northern and Southern Maya: Perspectives from Three Unprovenanced Puuc Columns


Jaime J. Awe and Marc Zender
K'awiil Chan K'inich, Lord of K'an Hix: Royal titles and Symbols of Rulership at Cahal Pech, Belize







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Hadley DesMeules and Antonia E. Foias
Connections between the Northern and Southern Maya: Perspectives from Three Unprovenanced Puuc Columns

Three unprovenanced Classic Maya relief columns from the Puuc region share nearly identical and indeed uncommon iconography with the "warrior stelae" of Piedras Negras. Each of the three Puuc columns and the Piedras Negras "warrior stelae" feature a frontally depicted king wearing an elaborate mosaic War Serpent headdress and costume characteristic of the Teotihuacan military costume. The rare frontal pose combined with the Teotihuacan influenced costume and headdress combine to compose a specific image, one that suggests an intimate knowledge of both Northern and Southern Maya art. Such a familiarity with both Northern and Southern Maya art would only have been possible if networks of communication and interaction were in place throughout the Maya region, and especially between Piedras Negras and the columns' sites of origin in Campeche.

Jaime J. Awe and Marc Zender
K'awiil Chan K'inich, Lord of K'an Hix: Royal titles and Symbols of Rulership at Cahal Pech, Belize

Hieroglyphic inscriptions provide one of the most important sources of information on Classic period Maya rulers, and on the sociopolitical relations between lowland Maya polities. The discovery of new inscribed monuments and artifacts, particularly in Maya sub-regions where inscriptions are rare, can therefore provide critical new information on the political significance of these sites. In this paper, we describe the recent discovery at Cahal Pech of three bone rings, a bone pin, and fragments of turtle shell that were decorated with low-relief inscriptions. The hieroglyphic texts from Cahal Pech, along with the rich contents of the tomb where the artifacts were discovered, provide compelling evidence that Classic period Belize Valley elite employed symbols of rulership akin to those used by the powerful rulers of larger centers in the Maya lowlands.